Most people know (or logically assume) we are not allowed to allow certain things to happen with our automobiles. We cannot let a person with no driver’s license or a suspended driver’s license drive our car. If we do, we are accepting responsibility for whatever happens while he is driving it. We know that we cannot allow people to transport people who are carrying illegal things like, drugs, open alcohol, and illegal weapons. If we do, we assume liability for those actions, according to our car accident attorneys.

However, there are other situations that we should know about before giving our car to someone else. There are situations where we are accepting responsibility for someone, and if a person is injured or killed, we (and the driver) are equally responsible.

Though laws vary from state to state, let’s go through some situations that are common in most places.

Employee Driving a Company Car

If an employee is given a company car to use in execution of his job, and he causes an accident, it is the company who is responsible for the damages. The employee may have been driving carelessly and talking on his cell phone, and the accident could be totally his fault. The company is legally liable, and lawsuits that are brought about the case are brought against the company, not the employee.

However, if this employee was using the company vehicle and was not performing his job duties during the time of the accident, it is the driver and not the company that assumes liability. For example, if the employee took the company car for an evening out on the town with friends and was in an accident, he was not in the commission of his duties, and therefore he is responsible for the damages.

Parent Who Signs for Their Minor Child to Get His or Her License

In some states like Florida, a parent or legal guardian must sign the application for a minor to receive their driver’s license. The adult who signs the application is accepting responsibility for any negligent driving by the minor until they turn 18. If a parent allows a child to drive their vehicle and they have an accident, the parent or guardian is responsible for all the damages, even if the child has no licenses at all.

Incompetent Drivers

This includes (but is not limited to):

  • A driver that is under the influence of drugs or alcohol
  • A driver with limited experience such as a teen with a learner’s permit
  • A driver who affected by a recent illness and shows signs of being unwell
  • A person of advanced age showing signs of slow reflexes, confusion, or memory problems
  • A driver that you know has previously proven them to be reckless

Owning an automobile is a privilege and a major responsibility. People are injured and/or killed due to the mishandling of vehicles every day. If you own a car, our car accident lawyers believe it is up to you to ensure it is operated by safe and legal drivers.

For more information, speak to a car accident attorney today.